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AGBU Sydney

AGBU Sydney

Fa8kakan Baevgie[akan Wndfaniye Muiyjuyn | from 1963

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AGBU Sydney

The history of AGBU in Australia, and of Alex Manoogian Saturday School, trace their roots back to the historic day in 1906, when the visionary Boghos Nubar Pasha and others stablished what was to become a global Armenian philanthropic organisation.

The AGBU became a source of comfort and strength for the generation orphaned by the 1915 Genocide, equipping survivors with a sense of purpose and a motivation to rebuild their lives. Through its service to our nation, the AGBU bore witness to the old axion that ‘unity is strength’.

In over a century of fulfilling its mission, the AGBU has become the largest Armenian philanthropic organisation, supporting, serving standing with and dedicating itself to the needs of the Armenian nation through wide range of activities.

The AGBU has tried to keep in step with the needs of the times, and has been flexible in adjusting to changes in the political and economic landscape. And so, in 1924, the AGBU Headquarters moved from Cairo to Geneva and from there to Paris, eventually finding its resting place in New York City, USA.

Through its many chapters in Armenia, Artsakh and the Diaspora, the AGBU continues to fulfil its educational, cultural, scientific and sports mission.

Often, the decline of one diasporan community heralds the birth of a new one. Over the past 100 years, the fate of the Armenian people has (interruptions notwithstanding, especially in the Middle East) followed the same pattern of community-formation inherited from the Ottoman Empire in 1915. As Armenians started emigrating from the Middle Eastern to faraway Sydney, they brought with them the familiar trilogy of community structures: church, school and community centre.

Armenian migration to Australia began in the 1850s, in particular with the arrival of businessman from India and the Far East. The next phase of settlement came with the survivors and orphans of the Armenian Genocide in 1915, who gave birth to the Diaspora as we know it. Finally, following World War Two, and in particular beginning in the 1960s, large number of Armenians chose Australia as their new destination, forming the Australian-Armenian community as we know it.

In the midst of the struggles facing Armenians in different parts of the world, 1963 was a year of celebration for the AGBU family as its Sydney Chapter commenced its work. The Chapter had been inaugurated in 1962 under the auspices of His Eminence, Bishop Assoghig Ghazarian, and with the active support and efforts of Rev. Father Aramais Mirzaian.

The AGBU Sydney Chapter’s first committee was as follows:

Honorary President: His Eminence, Bishop Assoghig Ghazarian

Honorary Vice President: Rev. Father Aramais Mirzaian

Chairman: Mack Hagopian

Secretary : Vahan Hannesian

Treasurer: Armen Apcar

Advisor: Edgar A. Edgar and Nahabed M. Nahabed.

 

Vahan Hannesian [Secretary], Father Aramais Mirzayan, Mac Hagopian [Chairman] Standing left to right – Nahapet M. Nahapet, E.A. Edgar, Armen Apkar [Treasurer]

Vahan Hannesian [Secretary], Father Aramais Mirzayan, Mac Hagopian [Chairman]
Standing left to right – Nahapet M. Nahapet, E.A. Edgar, Armen Apkar [Treasurer]

1967 - Seated left to right – Minas Apkar, Noubar Soghomonian, Antranig Keshishian, John Batmanian, Toros Kasabian, Armen Apkar, Berj Sedefdjian Standing left to right – John Nahabedian, Sarkis Boghossian, Hagop Khatchadourian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Noubar Sissagian, Hagop Sebouhian, Varouj Tchetchenian, Zaven Tchetchenian, Neshan Arakelian, Ara Moushigian

1967 – Seated left to right – Minas Apkar, Noubar Soghomonian, Antranig Keshishian, John Batmanian, Toros Kasabian, Armen Apkar, Berj Sedefdjian
Standing left to right – John Nahabedian, Sarkis Boghossian, Hagop Khatchadourian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Noubar Sissagian, Hagop Sebouhian, Varouj Tchetchenian, Zaven Tchetchenian, Neshan Arakelian, Ara Moushigian

1970 - Seated left to right – Haroutune Messerlian, Mihran Palandjian, Mac Hagopian [Chairman], Neshan Arakelian, Jirair Constantian Standing left to right – Hratch Norigian, Simon Malcolm, Mihran Manaserian, Zaven Simonian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian

1970 – Seated left to right – Haroutune Messerlian, Mihran Palandjian, Mac Hagopian [Chairman], Neshan Arakelian, Jirair Constantian
Standing left to right – Hratch Norigian, Simon Malcolm, Mihran Manaserian, Zaven Simonian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian

1978 - Front row left to right – Zaven Simonian, Toros Boghossian, Guest ARCHBISHOP Karekin Kazandjian, Siran Chichmanian, Ara Moushigian [Chairman], Haroutune Meserlian Back row left to right – Steve Ritlain, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, George Dertadian, Vahe Karayan

1978 – Front row left to right – Zaven Simonian, Toros Boghossian, Guest ARCHBISHOP Karekin Kazandjian, Siran Chichmanian, Ara Moushigian [Chairman], Haroutune Meserlian
Back row left to right – Steve Ritlain, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, George Dertadian, Vahe Karayan

1985 - Seated left to right – Sarkis Boghossian, George Izmiritlian, AGBU SYDNEY Benefactors Dr Alec Alexander & Mrs Isabelle Alexander, Zaven Tchetchenian [ Chairman] Standing left to right – Vahe Artinian, Joseph Hajetian, Antranig Kapterian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Arto Karagelinian, Aram Hagopian

1985 – Seated left to right – Sarkis Boghossian, George Izmiritlian, AGBU SYDNEY Benefactors Dr Alec Alexander & Mrs Isabelle Alexander, Zaven Tchetchenian [ Chairman]
Standing left to right – Vahe Artinian, Joseph Hajetian, Antranig Kapterian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Arto Karagelinian, Aram Hagopian

1986- Left to right – Arto Karagelinian, Vahe Artinian, Vahe Boyadjian, Jirair Constantian, Aram Hagopian, PREMIER OF NSW Hon. Nick Greiner, Zaven Tchetchenian [Chairman], Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, George Izmiritlian, Antranig Kapterian

1986- Left to right – Arto Karagelinian, Vahe Artinian, Vahe Boyadjian, Jirair Constantian, Aram Hagopian, PREMIER OF NSW Hon. Nick Greiner, Zaven Tchetchenian [Chairman], Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, George Izmiritlian, Antranig Kapterian

1995 - Seated left to right – Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, AGBU SYDNEY BENEFACTOR Dr Alec Alexander, AGBU – MIOUTUNE MONTHLY Editor Avedis Yapoudjian, Vahe Artinian [Chairman], Aram Hagopian Stranding left to right – Noubar Pezikian, Norma Pezikian-Lauder, Hampar Cakmac, Lucy Aroyan, Dickran Dickranian

1995 – Seated left to right – Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, AGBU SYDNEY BENEFACTOR Dr Alec Alexander, AGBU – MIOUTUNE MONTHLY Editor Avedis Yapoudjian, Vahe Artinian [Chairman], Aram Hagopian
Stranding left to right – Noubar Pezikian, Norma Pezikian-Lauder, Hampar Cakmac, Lucy Aroyan, Dickran Dickranian

1996 - Seated left to right – Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Nairi Derderian, Aram Hagopian Standing left to right – Hampar Chakmak, Noubar Pezikian, Boghos Bakla, Arto Karagelinian, Guest Speaker Professor George Bournoutian, Dickran Dickranian, Vahe Artinian [ Chairman]

1996 – Seated left to right – Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Nairi Derderian, Aram Hagopian
Standing left to right – Hampar Chakmak, Noubar Pezikian, Boghos Bakla, Arto Karagelinian, Guest Speaker Professor George Bournoutian, Dickran Dickranian, Vahe Artinian [ Chairman]

2004 - Seated left to right – Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Aram Hagopian [ chairman], Taleen Tashdjian, Vahe Artinian Standing left to right – Vrej Manoogian, Hagop Sebouhian, Arto Karagelinian , Raffi Hagopian, George Elmassian, Toros Boghossian

2004 – Seated left to right – Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Aram Hagopian [ chairman], Taleen Tashdjian, Vahe Artinian
Standing left to right – Vrej Manoogian, Hagop Sebouhian, Arto Karagelinian , Raffi Hagopian, George Elmassian, Toros Boghossian

2015 - Seated left to right – Garo Setian, Toros Boghossian [Chairman], Guest ARCHBISHOP Haigazoun Nadjarian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Arto Karagelinian  Standing left to right – Haig Garabedian, Vrej Manoogian, Sarkis Manoukian, Dickran Yeganian

2015 – Seated left to right – Garo Setian, Toros Boghossian [Chairman], Guest ARCHBISHOP Haigazoun Nadjarian, Hovaness Kouyoumdjian, Arto Karagelinian
Standing left to right – Haig Garabedian, Vrej Manoogian, Sarkis Manoukian, Dickran Yeganian

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Armenian Student Societies

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Collaborative Dance ~ “Miyasnootyan Bar”

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Shall We Dance?

Shall We Dance?

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Tamzara Kids

Tamzara Kids

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Armenian Music and Culture

Armenian Music and Culture

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2016 – The Year for Our Kids

2016 – The Year for Our Kids

From its inception, a major goal for AGBU Youth was to successfully form young adult teams to get the club’s wheels into motion. Four years on, not only do we have 4 senior teams, but , we are also in the fortunate position of having many more hands on deck, working very hard behind the scenes to succeed in more ventures and accomplish more as a club. So in 2016, the time is right to turn our attention to our future, our next generation: our kids!   As a club our intentions and objectives are aligned across the board. Our immediate goals are to: Start Kids Basketball Teams Start Kids Dance group   Our first goal is already well and truly underway! Our brand new u10’s team started playing competition games just a couple weeks ago. They have had an amazing start already with 3 convincing wins.  More importantly, we are incredibly happy to report that all the kids are having a great time whilst learning a lot about a great team sport. It’s a privilege and a joy to witness the kids learning and growing within their team; making new friends and most importantly becoming a family through sport. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing our next generation starting out exactly where we did umpteen years ago.   The best news is, u10’s is only the beginning! Throughout 2016, 2017 and in future years, we will endeavour to bring together as many youth teams as possible. U8’s, u12’s, u14’s, u16’s & u18’s we’re looking for you! If you, your kids, grandkids, nieces and nephews are interested in basketball or futsal, please contact us and we will make every effort to ensure the team becomes a reality!     The first steps of our second goal kicks off on Friday the 4th of March; the launch of Tamzara kids for children aged 4 and up.   This class will be an opportunity for young children to understand and immerse themselves in Armenian culture. The energy that young children bring to a stage, performing the dances that have been performed by Armenians for hundreds of years is always a pleasure to watch. Not only will they have a place to learn dancing, they will also be learning about Armenian culture in the process. Each dance has a significance, a place where it was originated and it’s own beautiful music to accompany it. The little ones will be able to show off their dance moves, and make some friends in their barakhoump family where they can dance, laugh and learn together – and eventually perform in traditional costumes together on the big stage! Rehearsals will be held at 2 Yeo St, Neutral Bay, at 5:30pm every Friday! For more information on dance please email Tamzara Artistic Director Nazarena at tamzara.dancegroup@gmail.com   See you there!!   If you’d like any more information about the abovementioned activities, or anything else pertaining to the AGBU Youth community please do not hesitate to contact us at agbuyouth@gmail.com at any time!  ...

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